League City Historic District

& Local Museums

League City’s Historic District showcases the city’s authentically Texan roots, distinct southern flair, and iconic live oak trees. Historic homes and buildings are scattered throughout the district, along with museums, gardens, parks, boutiques, and restaurants.

WBCSM

Discover

the Historic District

Located within the 500–900 block of E. Main St. (FM 518) in League City

St. Mary's Church

Nearby Museums

  • Space Center Houston

    1601 NASA Pkwy
    Houston, Texas

     281-244 2100

  • Lone Star Flight Museum

    11551 Aerospace Ave, Houston, Texas

    346-708-2517

  • San Jacinto Museum

    One Monument Circle
    La Porte, Texas

    281-479-2421

A QUICK AND EASY GUIDE TO EXPLORING

LEAGUE CITY'S HISTORIC DISTRICT

 

League Park

This local park is one of League City’s crowning jewels, and historically important to the city. The park was gifted to the city by its namesake, J.C. League, along with a two-story bandstand gazebo. A band would perform on the second story of the gazebo, while vendors sold refreshments like ice cream on the ground level.

 

The original gazebo was destroyed in the infamous 1900 hurricane, rebuilt, then destroyed again by a fire a few years later. A new gazebo was constructed in 1976 in celebration of America’s bicentennial, and that gazebo still stands today.

 

The park has been a local gathering place for events like concerts, festivals, parties, and more for over 100 years. League Park recently underwent renovations to restore it to its 19th-century look, and remains a beautiful place to visit. A Boundless playground is also on site for children of all abilities to enjoy.

Visit League Park at 512 2nd St.

Butler's Courtyard

First built in 1909 and located in the heart of the historic district, this property was once the location of League City’s first bank, and was the city's first brick building. Since then, the building has seen many businesses come and go including a post office, café, hardware store, drug store, and residential apartments. In fact, you can still step inside the original vault from its days as a bank. Only recently in the building’s long history has its antique appeal served as a stunning backdrop for momentous occasions, private events, and nuptial celebrations. Learn more about Butler's Courtyard at butlerscourtyard.com

Visit Butler's Courtyard at 122 N Michigan St.

Helen's Garden

One of the most photographed places in League City, this beautiful garden was established in 1994 to honor the memory of League City philanthropist, Helen Hall. Helen Hall was born Helen Lewis in League City in 1907. After marrying her High School sweetheart, Walter Hall, Helen went on to become the city's first female postmaster and helped establish League City's first library, which is also named after her. Helen passed away in 1981, and the garden was created by her husband, through the League City Garden Club—of which Helen was a charter member.

Visit Helen's Garden at 701 E. Main St.

The Shoppes at Founder’s Square

While most of the houses in the Historic District are privately owned and not open for tours, the Shoppes at Founder’s Square offer a peek inside some of League City’s historic homes. Founder’s Square is made up of five locally-owned boutiques and a tea room, all located within century-old homes. Browse unique gift items, gourmet treats and coffees, jewelry, clothing, antiques, and more. Each shop has its own charm—from gorgeous Victorian architecture on the outside to whimsical assortments of treasures on the inside—and the shop owners are friendly and hospitable. Founder’s Square is located within walking distance from League Park, Helen’s Garden, and several eateries within the League City Historic District. Learn more.

 

Visit the Shoppes at Founder’s Square at 501 E Main St.

Butler Longhorn Museum

League City plays a significant role in Texas history, specifically in preserving the iconic Texas Longhorn cattle breed. Through a series of exhibits, the Butler Longhorn Museum tells the story of how League City founders saved longhorn cattle from extinction. The museum also features an historic firearms collection, artifacts from the city’s founding families, a vintage movie theater with popcorn and refreshments, gift shop, art gallery, and research center. Learn more at butlerlonghornmuseum.com

 

Visit the Butler Longhorn Museum at 1220 Coryell St.

West Bay Common Schoolchildren’s Museum & Barn Museum

This area was once League City’s main thoroughfare. J.C. League, the city’s founder, donated the land specifically to accommodate a school. The original schoolhouse was destroyed by the 1900 hurricane, but another historic schoolhouse stands in its place to showcase what school was like for children in the late 19th century. Next door to the schoolhouse is the Barn Museum, which once housed League City’s first fire station. The original fire hose is displayed outside the museum. Inside the Barn Museum you will find an eclectic collection of artifacts that tell the story of League City’s history, along with a gift shop. This historic area also features a restored 1920s Icehouse/Barbershop, along with other historic structures and artifacts. Learn more at oneroomschoolhouse.org

 

 

Visit this historic site at 210 N Kansas Ave.

Railroad Section House

Railroad Section House

Now in use as the League City Park District office, this building was once the home of the Railroad Superintendent of the GH&H (Galveston, Houston, & Henderson) Railroad Company. The home was built between 1887 and 1897 and is a beautiful example of Folk Victorian architecture. Originally, the home was adjacent to the railroad depot, but the station has since been moved to Dickinson, about six miles away. You can visit the 1896 League City Railroad Depot, along with the 1902 Dickinson Railroad Depot, at the Dickinson Railroad Museum. The railroad section house resides in League Park, a stone’s throw from the historic railroad. The building is not open for tours, as it is a functioning City office building, but visitors can appreciate the architectural details, including the jigsaw trim along the porch and the sunburst design in the gables.

 

Visit the Railroad Section House at 512 2nd St.

 

Historic Homes and Majestic Oaks Tour

Explore League City's Victorian and Early 20th Century Architecture and Century-Old Oaks

Drive or stroll through the Historic District, and view dozens of examples of Victorian architecture, all beneath the sprawling canopies of majestic century-old live oak trees. The homes listed on the tour are occupied and not open for indoor tours, but their architectural beauty can be easily seen from the roads and sidewalks. The Historic Homes Tour brochure, seen below, gives a short history of each home and building listed. In following the tour map, you will learn the stories of some of League City's first families and what life was like in League City, Texas at the turn of the century. 

League City Historic Homes Tour Map

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League City

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

300 W. Walker Street 

League City, Texas 77573

281-554-1021

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